#jobsreport: 93.8 million adults unemployed (may -640,000 june -432,000 july -144,000)

The number of people not in the labor force reached another record high in July, according to new jobs data released Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.The BLS reports that 93,770,000 people (16 and older) were neither employed last month nor had made specific efforts to find work in the prior four weeks.
The number of people outside the workforce in July increased 144,000 over June’s record when 93,626,000 were not in the workforce.

July’s labor force participation rate however remained the the same as June at 62.6 percent. Before last month the labor force participation rate had not been that low since October 1977, when the participation rate was 62.4 percent.

The BLS reports that the civilian labor force did experience a slight uptick from 157,037,000 in June to 157,106,000 in July after the month of June saw it drop by 432,000.

While the labor participation rate remains at the lowest its been since the late 1970s, the BLS highlighted that the unemployment rate remained at 5.3 percent and nonfarm payroll jobs increased by 215,000.

RECORD 93,770,000 AMERICANS NOT IN LABOR FORCE

march #jobsreport: 93.2 million adults (37.3%) not working: 37 yr low #palin2016 #sarahpalin @sarahpalinusa

The number of Americans 16 years and older who did not participate in the labor force–meaning they neither had a job nor actively sought one in the last four weeks–rose from 92,898,000 in February to 93,175,000 in March, according to data released today by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

That is the first time the number of Americans out of the labor force has exceeded 93 million.

Also from February to March, the labor force participation rate dropped from 62.8 percent to 62.7 percent, matching a 37-year low.

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Five times in the last twelve months, the participation rate has been as low as 62.8 percent; but March’s 62.7 percent, which matches the participation rate seen in September and December of 2014, is the lowest since February of 1978.

BLS employment statistics are based on the civilian noninstitutional population, which consists of all people 16 or older who were not in the military or an institution such as a prison, mental hospital or nursing home.

In March, the civilian non-institutional population was 250,080,000 according to BLS. Of that 250,080,000, 156,906,000 — or 62.7 percent — participated in the labor force, meaning they either had or job or had actively sought one in the last four weeks.

Of the 156,906,000 who did participate in the labor force, 148,331,000 had a job and 8,575,000 did not have a job but actively sought one. The 8,575,000 are the unemployed. They equaled 5.5 percent of the labor force—or the unemployment rate of 5.5 percent (which matched the unemployment rate seen in February 2015).

According to the BLS, the aging of the baby boom generation is a key factor affecting the labor force participation rate:

“The baby boomers’ exit from the prime-aged workforce and their movement into older age groups will lower the overall labor force participation rate, leading to a slowdown in the growth of the labor force,” explains the BLS.

“In 2000, baby boomers were aged 36 to 54 years and were in the group with the highest participation rates: the prime-aged group 25 to 54 years old. The participation rate for women in this group was 76.7 percent and for men was 91.6 percent, so that the overall participation rate of the group was 84.0 percent. The participation rate of the next-older age group, that 55 years and older, was 32.4 percent, so the difference between the two age groups was 52 percentage points. With the passage of every year after 2000, a segment of the baby-boomer population passes into the 55-years-and-older age group and thus moves from a group with a high participation rate in the labor force to an age category with a much lower particiption rate, causing the overall participation rate to decrease,” states BLS.

CNS News: march #jobsreport: 93.2 million adults not working: 62.7% #lpr 37 yr low

governor #palin: highest favorability in gop 2016 field #palin2016

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Though former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin was not included in a Public Policy Polling survey of potential 2016 Republican presidential contenders, she was still overwhelmingly the most liked person among Republican primary voters.

According to Public Policy Polling:

The best liked person we tested on this poll with Republican primary voters is actually Sarah Palin who has a 70/20 favorability rating. She’s followed by Huckabee at 64/18, Ryan at 58/18, Paul at 58/21, Bush at 56/18, Cruz at 45/20, and Christie at 40/38. Most of those numbers are similar to what they were a month ago but Christie’s seen a substantial drop from +18 at 47/29 a month ago to his new +2 net favorability.

The left-leaning polling outfit asked Republican primary voters, “Given the choices of Jeb Bush, Chris Christie, Ted Cruz, Mike Huckabee, Bobby Jindal, Rand Paul, Marco Rubio, Paul Ryan, and Scott Walker, who would you most like to see as the GOP candidate for President in 2016?”

Huckabee led among the group with 16% to 14% for former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush; 13% for Chris Christie; 11% for Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY); 8% each for Sens. Ted Cruz (R-TX), Marco Rubio (R-FL), and Paul Ryan (R-WI); 6% for Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker; and 5% for Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal. Ten percent of respondents either wanted someone else or were unsure of their preference.

The poll asked respondents how they viewed Palin in a separate question at the conclusion of the poll, and Palin’s favorability numbers show why former South Carolina Senator and Heritage Foundation President Jim DeMint said that Palin’s endorsement was the most influential in a Republican primary. The poll was conducted January 23 to 26 and has a margin of error of +/- 4.6 percentage points.

Breitbart’s Tony Lee: POLL: SARAH PALIN HAS HIGHEST FAVORABILITY RATING AMONG GOP PRIMARY VOTERS

governor #palin to return to #iowa for summit (#palin2016)

Former Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin will take part in the Iowa Freedom Summit in Des Moines on Jan. 24.

The inaugural event is being held by Citizens United and Congressman Steve King. The summit will serve as a place to discuss conservative ideas, as people get ready for the upcoming Iowa caucuses next year.

Other featured guests include Ben Carson, Newt Gingrich, Senator Ted Cruz, Mike Huckabee, Senator Rick Santorum and others. It will be held at Hoyt Sherman Place in Des Moines. For more information on the summit, go to IaFreedomSummit.com.

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